A new report has found that nearly half of the world’s top universities are providing courses in cryptocurrency and the blockchain.


Crypto on the Rise in Education

San Francisco-based crypto exchange Coinbase partnered up with research firm Qriously to conduct the study. The aim was to determine students’ thoughts and feelings on the cryptocurrency industry.

One of the key findings from the survey showed that 42 percent of the world’s top universities now offer at least one course on crypto and the blockchain. Additionally, 22 percent deliver more than one. Not only that, but the students in such classes come from a range of majors. Announcing it on their website, Coinbase noted that the results were collected from 675 U.S. students.

The New York University Stern School of Business is one university offering these courses. David Yermack, the finance department chair, first offered his course on blockchain and financial services in 2014. Then, only 35 students signed up. However, by spring 2018, that number had increased to 230. Yermack said:

A process is well underway that will lead to the migration of most financial data to blockchain-based organizations. Students will benefit greatly by studying this area.

Cryptocurrency and blockchain courses are offered at 11 of the top global universities. Stanford University offers the most with 10. This is followed by Cornell University at nine and the University of Pennsylvania with six. The National University of Singapore offers five, whereas the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich delivers three.

Stanford University offers 10 classes in blockchain and cryptocurrency.

Different Majors Are Getting Involved

Interestingly, the research found that interest in this industry cuts across different educational fields.

Social science majors made up a significant percentage, at 47 percent, who indicated they were interested in learning more. This is compared to computer science and engineering majors at 34 percent.

Of the 172 classes listed by the 50 universities, 15 percent were offered by business, economics, finance, and law departments. A further four percent were in social science departments such as anthropology, history, and political science.

Campbell Harvey, professor of international business at Duke University, said this knowledge will be valuable to graduating students, saying:

If you’re graduating from law school it’s a tough market these days. However, the law students that are trained in blockchain, they don’t need to apply anywhere. People are just asking them to join their firms.

Are you a student who has taken a cryptocurrency or blockchain course? Let us know in the comments below.


Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

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